Heh, remember when iCards and iTools were main nav items?!

CharlieHoehn.com

I was looking at screenshots of Apple.com’s former homepages (using the Internet Archive Wayback Machine) and decided to compile them into a slideshow. With the exception of Apple’s homepage in 1997, it’s pretty remarkable how little the core design has changed:

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After 15 years, the layout of Apple.com is still the same: prominently feature the latest product, with 3-4 little boxes below that highlight other recent products and company news. The homepage has become more evident and intuitive each year. Bigger pictures, less copy, bolder text, fewer items to click… It’s like a giant billboard. They stuck with a format that worked and continually refined it. [The two biggest changes: they moved the navigation bar to the top in 2000, then gave the entire site a facelift with the introduction of Leopard in 2007.]

It goes without saying that Apple’s strength is design, but their homepage deserves credit…

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Whoa.

cabel.com

Somewhere in Portland, there’s a very old building, and that very old building has a very, very old basement. An incredible basement, a video-game-level basement, a set-decorator’s dream basement.

And when you walk past the janitors office, with the wonderfully decked halls…

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And tromp down a sunken hallway…

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You find a old room. Mostly empty, dusty, and dead quiet.

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And then you start to look closer at the walls.

And you start to see things.

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(You see that Brown didn’t often pay his dime for coffee.)

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(You see that a lot of calculation was done right on the wall.)

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(You see that World War I was front and center on everyone’s mind.)

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(You wonder what was being tallied, and if it was better to win or lose.)

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(And you learn the tongue-in-check “rules” of the room.)

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And eventually, you crawl behind a corner, and discover a bundle of conduit.

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Conduit for…

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The NRA is despicable.

How the NRA carefully picks its way through national tragedies that would otherwise result in gun control debate (bolding mine):

After the April 16, 2007, Virginia Tech shootings that killed 32 people: “The NRA joins the entire country in expressing our deepest condolences to the families of Virginia Tech University and everyone else affected by this horrible tragedy. Our thoughts and prayers are with the families.”

After the Feb. 14, 2008, shootings at Northern Illinois University that killed six: “We think it is poor form for a politician or a special interest group to try to push a legislative agenda on the back of any tragedy. Now is the time for the Northern Illinois University community to grieve and to heal. We believe there is adequate time down the road to debate policy and politics.”

After the April 3, 2009, massacre at a Binghamton, N.Y., immigration center that killed 13: “Now is not the time to debate politics or discuss policy. It’s time for the families and communities to grieve.”

After the Jan. 8, 2011, shooting spree that wounded Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and killed six: “At this time, anything other than prayers for the victims and their families would be inappropriate.”

After the July 20, 2012, massacre at an Aurora, Colo., theater that left 12 dead and 58 wounded: “We believe that now is the time for families to grieve and for the community to heal. There will be an appropriate time down the road to engage in political and policy discussions.”

When does this magical future arrive, again? I think 5 years since Virginia Tech and 13 years since Columbine is “down the road” enough to start talking now, before more children are needlessly killed.

Why every pro-gun argument is wrong

I know I’m a complete left-wing whackjob nutcase, but this article on why gun rights advocates are completely batshit-fucking wrong is right up my alley.

And we all know that if this shooter turns out to have a Muslim name, plenty of Americans, including plenty of gun owners, will be more than happy to give up all kinds of rights in the name of fighting terrorism. Have the government read my email? Have my cell phone company turn over my call records? Check which books I’m taking out of the library? Make me take my shoes off before getting on a plane, just because some idiot tried to blow up his sneakers? Sure, do what you’ve got to do. But don’t make it harder to buy thousands of rounds of ammunition, because if we couldn’t do that we’d no longer be free.

 

Get started with some essentials to WordPress theme design.

Code Poet

What is “Theme Sense”? Theme Sense is an intuitive understanding of WordPress themes: the relationship between the files that make up a theme, and how those files fit in with WordPress. Theme Sense is what you’ll have at the end of this article.

Theme Sense is not about memorizing code

Let’s think about mathematics and “number sense” for a second. If you teach a kid just to memorize arithmetic facts on flashcards, without explaining why the answers are what they are, that kid may struggle when they encounter a fact they haven’t memorized. For example, demonstrating 5+2 = 7 using blocks helps the kid “see” how numbers work. They can then use this knowledge to help solve any problem they run into in the future, even if they haven’t memorized the answer.

Theme Sense works the same way. It’s important to focus on the larger picture of what you’re trying…

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WordPress elves!

The WordPress.com Blog

We love our holiday traditions here at WordPress.com, and my favorite is teaming up every year with a talented artist to ring in the season WordPress-style with a festive illustration. This year’s edition was created by Australian illustrator Glenn Thomas, also known as The Fox and King.

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Like in years past we’ve created desktop wallpapers from the art, but this year we took it one step further. Automattic’s Caroline Moore adapted the artwork into a new holiday theme called Cheer, available starting today on WordPress.com.

Cheer Traditional

Cheer is a festive, textured theme in two color palettes, perfect for personal sites and blogs. Deck the halls with this cheeky little elf, then share your holiday photos and stories with friends and family.

Cheer Modern

You can read more about Cheer on the theme showcase, or preview it on your blog by going to Appearance -> Themes.

Wallpapers

And as always, we’ve…

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